Education in Transition

How are transgender teachers transforming the debate, the school, and society?

In South America, transgender women are murdered and deprived of their rights as citizens every single day. But a growing number of them are turning to education as a fundamental way to trigger change, as they are knocking down prejudice, altering their communities, and making this mission possible.

Education in transition tells stories of 6 transgender educators in Brazil, Argentina, and Colombia. The reader learns more about the topic, hears the stories of the transgender women, explores the reasons as to why many transgender women are discriminated in schools and leaving schools for alternative jobs. The visual pages for the two issues will explore the topics by using infographics, video, images, and quotes from the interviews.

Education in Transition was selected by the European Journalism Centre Grants Program (2018)

YEAR
2018
ROLE
  • UX/UI
  • Data Visualization
TEAM
Vanessa De Sa / Journalist

Toni Pires / Photographer

Colors & Material

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Typefaces

Lato Bold

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Lato Regular

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Prata Regular

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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Playfair Display Bold

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Visualizing user typologies

Alanis Bello

University teacher and poet from Colombia

In Colombia there no more than 6 or 7 trans teachers. I went with my male name and all my students expected to find a man and I arrived so crazy. Let's say that I am, well, ``performative``, so I love to get to my classes and encourage my students to curiosity. Then, I arrived with the heels like that, I was so made-up, drag and everyone was like: ``what is this?``. It is not expected that a trans person can be a teacher.

Educating from a transvestite perspective means healing. It is a healing and poetic pedagogy because we seek to heal the wounds produced by hate, anger, discrimination that we all live. Not only trans people but all people who have a body.

Ana Paula Braga Luz

Director of Red Comunitaria Trans from Colombia

Transpassando is a project that prepares trans students to the university and to the job market Being a trans teacher is currently extremely complicated precisely because people have the idea that transsexual people, transgendered people will sexualize children, they will serve as a negative mirror for those children to become gay, lesbian or transsexual. The point is: you do not become a transsexual, you›re already born one. It is a perception, it is something that already comes from within. I have always been attracted to the roles assigned to women since I was a child. One thing I always ask my students is: who chose to be straight? And the answer is: ``No, I›ve always been straight.`` In the case of boys, I have always liked girls. So why did your gay colleague choose to be gay? Who sees himself as a man or as a woman? No, I always saw myself as a boy, I always saw myself as a girl. So why did I decide to become a woman? The lesson I give to my students is just that: it is beyond what I choose.

Daniela Salamanca

Director of Red Comunitaria Trans from Colombia

She is a non-formal educator who uses art as an education tool for trans prostitutes
What were our dreams? It was weird because many people say..it›s not crazy, it›s ironic, it›s very strong because what we used to dream was having an identity of our own, or being a boy or a girl. It›s like living with the genre we felt comfortable with. We used to dream about this when this is the reality of many boys and girls. So we have always had dreams, we have always dreamed about the reality of other people, about the same rights as everyone else in society. It’s really crazy, but dreaming about a house or a job or about studying as if it were not the reality of many people, you know? It’s very sad that the dreams of the trans people are the rights of other people, the realities of other people.

Blasia Reynoso

Retired teacher and school director from Catamarca

There is a before, which was Horacio, that I do
not punish him and. For me he already died. He
has already left, But that it wasn’t casual what
it was; because, it was a way of being able to
stay, of being able to be, of being able ... with his profession, with his life, with the fact of a different sexual orientation, this of being homosexual or
gay. And, suddenly, he was inserted into a system that was and is very segregating. I have often said in public: ``The educational system is very discriminating.`` Well, it was incredible to think that that place where you teach tolerance, you have this other look.

Ava Morgan

Non-formal educator from Resistencia from Argentina

Well, I realize that one can become an educator. That one can transmit experiences of learning without having a degree, without having a profession, that can lead to educate mouth to mouth; that, of taking the experiences, the knowledge that one is acquiring through courses, training and of doing ourselves also pieces of training, so that the coworkers understand that it is necessary that we train as educators or as persons, leader. This is good for me. The word ‘leader’ is a bit rough. But if we dream, it has to be very big.

Ursula Ximenes

Non-formal educator from Resistencia from Argentina

There is a past, there is a present and there is a future. And the future is in the hands of children: girls, boys and transgender children, who today they are manifested, and who are protected by national law. There is adolescence and there is also trans/transvestite youth. And that's why I tell you that there was everything: there was a past, there is a present and there will also be a future. And the future will surely be much better than our present and that our past. And that will continue to be recharged so that the next generations continue to be much better. And that our look and these struggles would be for other things. That is to fight for end hunger and not to continue asking for our rights.

Visualizing design concept

The visual concept proposes a storytelling format to tell the stories of transgender women and their battles to belong. The landing page introduces the topic with serious and bold intentions to highlight the stories of transgender women. The black and white photographs of the trans women show their emotional connection to the topic and their resilient story.

The main website is divided into 4 main sections where the audience learns more about the topic, hears the stories of the transgender women, explores the reasons as to why many transgender women are discriminated in schools and leaving schools for alternative jobs. The visual pages for the two issues will explore the topics by using infographics, video, images, and quotes from the interviews.

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About

The landing page takes you to a video and quote of Alanis Bello where she recites a poem that portrays her experiences as a transgender educator and a force of determination.

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Stories

The stories section recounts 6 interviews of transgender educators who have broken the status quo and made it their mission to be transformative forces of education. Their stories express ones of resilience and courage.

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Being a transgender woman in South America

The website highlights two main issues for belonging as a transgender woman in Latin America, specifically Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia. The first issue discusses the everyday struggles and difficulties of being a transgender woman in South America.

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How inclusive schools really are

The second issue discussed the difficulties transgender face in educational institutions and the reasons as to why they drop out of school. It also highlights the persistence of transgender women to educate and have as much equality as any other person.

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Making Of

The making of page recounts the travels and experiences of Vanessa De Sa and Toni Pires across their journey to Argentina, Colombia, and Brazil.

Visualizing Data Features

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Comparing Countries

Hover over the hotspot icon to see the percentage of religious communities condemning behavior and prostitution. The color range shows the highest percentage of one country in comparison to the other.

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Comparing Numbers

The numbers act as a counter to show the number of transgender individuals killed in Latin America.

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Comparing Percentage

The data shows the percentage of transgender women working in the sex industry in Brazil, Argentina, and Colombia. The percentage shows very high numbers and highlights the gravity of the situation.

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Comparing Countries Globally

Hover over the hotspot icon to see the percentage of LGBT employees that remain closeted at work in the US, Brazil, & UK. The color range shows the highest percentage of one country in comparison to the other.

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Mapping Bar Charts

The data shows a series of bar charts of hate and discrimination within school environments.

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Comparing Age

The age comparison shows the life expectancy of victims from transphobic attacks and police violence in Brazil, Argentina, and Colombia.